Food Focus: Chicken Broth Is Great For Your Gut

Chicken broth bowl

From “Nourishing Traditions” by Sally Fallon "Good broth will resurrect the dead," says a South American proverb. A cure-all in traditional households and the magic ingredient in classic gourmet cuisine, stock or broth made from bones of chicken, fish and beef builds strong bones, assuages sore throats, nurtures the sick, puts vigor in the step and sparkle in your love life--so say grandmothers, midwives and healers. For chefs, stock is the magic elixir for making soul-warming soups and matchless sauces.

Science validates what our grandmothers knew. Rich homemade chicken broths help cure colds. Stock contains minerals in a form the body can absorb easily—not just calcium but also magnesium, phosphorus, silicon, sulfur and trace minerals. It contains the broken down material from cartilage and tendons--stuff like chondroitin sulphates and glucosamine, now sold as expensive supplements for arthritis and joint pain.

Want to try to make your own broth? It does need to sit and simmer for a long time but makes great soup and is so nutritious, even for your soul! Home made soup or broth are perfect winter snacks to help you keep normal blood sugar levels and stop sugar cravings.

From Jamie's Kitchen by Jamie Oliver

Easy Chicken Bone Broth


Makes 4 litres/7 pints
• 2kg (4 and 1/2 lb) raw chicken carcasses, preferably free-range or organic, legs or wings chopped
• 1/2 head of garlic, unpeeled and bashed
• 5 sticks of celery, roughly chopped
• 2 medium leeks, roughly chopped
• 2 medium onions, roughly chopped
• 2 large carrots, roughly chopped
• 3 bay leaves
• 2 sprigs of fresh rosemary
• 5 sprigs of fresh parsley
• 5 sprigs of fresh thyme
• 5 whole black peppercorns
• 6 litres cold water


Place the chicken carcasses, garlic, vegetables, herbs and peppercorns in a large, deep-bottomed pan. Add the cold water and bring to the boil, skim, then turn the heat down to a simmer. Continue to simmer gently for 3-4 hours, skimming as necessary, then pass the stock through a fine sieve. Allow to cool for about half an hour, then refrigerate. Once the stock is cold it should look clear and slightly amber in colour. I usually divide it into small plastic containers at this point and freeze it. It will keep in the fridge for about 4 days and in the freezer for 2-3 months.

If you are following a low FODMAP diet then just leave out the garlic and onions and only use the green parts of the leeks.

If you have a pressure cooker it reduces cooking time to about 30 minutes.